Jurassic Park

Jurassic Park

“John, if The Pirates of the Caribbean breaks down, the pirates don’t eat the tourists.”

It’s hard to think of a 90s movie more iconic than Jurassic Park. Directed by the legendary Steven Spielberg (E.T., Jaws) and starring Sam Neill, Laura Dern, and Jeff Goldblum, this is a movie that captivated everyone who saw it in theaters. Like all great sci-fi movies, it sparked our imagination for what science could do while also reminding us of the importance of ethics. It has all of the classic sci-fi qualifications along with a thrilling plot, great special effects, and a better original score than most sci-fi films. And it’s just as impressive today as it was when it came out 24 years ago.

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Metropolis

Metropolis

“The mediator between the head and the hands must be the heart.”

Tracing a genre of art to an original source can be murky, but the 1927 film Metropolis was definitely the first real sci-fi movie. Directed by Expressionist Austrian-German director Fritz Lang (M, Fury), Metropolis wrote the formula that would be followed for years to come. Being 90 years old, there are technical and artistic aspects of the movie that don’t hold up well; but the message and style of the movie, as well as its historic significance, merit viewings even today.

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2001: A Space Odyssey

2001: A Space Odyssey

“This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardize it.”

2001: A Space Odyssey is a masterpiece of cinema. Directed by Stanley Kubrick (The Shining, A Clockwork Orange), this 1968 film is widely regarded as one of the most influential science fiction films of all time. That said, it helps to have appropriate expectations for this film. If you’re expecting a gripping plot or a coherent message, you’re going to have a bad time. 2001: A Space Odyssey is more like a trip to an abstract art museum than a trip to the movies: it’s beautiful and stimulating, but it’s ultimately up to you to imply meaning based on your personal interpretation. Kubrick himself has refused to offer any explanation for the baffling ending, and, although many have put forth theories, none have completely resolved all of the mysteries presented here.

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Back to the Future

Back to the Future

“Yeah, well, history is gonna change.”

Back to the Future was, and still is, a cultural icon. Written and directed by Robert Zemeckis (Forrest Gump, Who Framed Roger Rabbit?) and starring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd, and Lea Thompson, Back to the Future brought time travel from the deep recesses of science fiction into the mainstream spotlight. Although The Terminator had dabbled in time travel just the year before and a few other major movies had sent people forward in time, no other mainstream movie had dealt with things like a time paradox—let alone in a way that made sense to virtually every viewer. Back to the Future made this hard science fiction concept cool and fun and brought it into the common vernacular. Many time travel movies since then owe part of their success to this groundbreaking movie.

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Blade Runner

Blade Runner

“The light that burns twice as bright burns half as long.”

Blade Runner is an iconic 1982 sci-fi film directed by Ridley Scott (Alien, Gladiator) and starring Harrison Ford. It walks a fine line between hard sci-fi and mainstream cinema, managing to keep the best parts of each: it poses some interesting moral and philosophical questions without overdoing it or sacrificing the plot for its message. If you’re not looking for the deeper questions, this is perfectly viable as a straight sci-fi detective story. But those questions are the most interesting part of the movie. It brings to mind a question from a character in Mass Effect, another sci-fi series that was likely influenced by Blade Runner: “Does this unit have a soul?”

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Guardians of the Galaxy

guardians-galaxy-walking

“You said it, bitch. We’re the Guardians of the Galaxy.”

Guardians of the Galaxy, directed by James Gunn (Super) and starring Chris Pratt, Bradley Cooper, and Zoe Saldana, was a risky movie to make, especially for the budget Marvel Studios gave it: $170 million. Gunn, the director, had no major successes and only one movie to his name, and Pratt, the main star, was untested as an action hero. The source material, the Guardians of the Galaxy from Marvel Comics, was a relatively unknown franchise. Did the risk pay off? Yes. It paid off in a big way.

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Donnie Darko

Donnie Darko

“And what if you could go back in time and take all those hours of pain and darkness and replace them with something better?”

The first thing to know about Donnie Darko is that the entire story is not contained in the movie. The movie references a book, The Philosophy of Time Travel, which is vital to understanding the story, but only hinted at in the film. The official website for the film contained the vital excerpts from the book. I’ll admit that I was a little lost after my first viewing of the movie; but things neatly fell into place when I reviewed the short book excerpts on the web.

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